Sole parents and unemployed face poverty as nation surges ahead

The income gap between people without paid work and sole parents, and the broader community is widening, according to a new study tracking income support over two decades. Australian Income Support Since 2000: Those Left Behind, will be launched today by the ACOSS/UNSW Sydney Poverty and Inequality Partnership to mark Anti-Poverty Week. The report notes median household incomes have grown 45% since June 2000 with Age and Disability Support Pensions almost keeping pace. “People receiving unemployment and single parent income support payments have been badly cast adrift,” said Dr Cassandra Goldie, CEO of ACOSS. “Those doing it toughest have been held further behind, making it that much harder to look after their health and families, as well as participate in the workforce. “Apart from the brief period when the Coronavirus supplement was paid, the performance of the income support system during this period of robust economic growth has left whole groups of people further and further…


Poverty, Property and Place

Download Poverty, Property and Place: A geographic analysis of poverty after housing costs in Australia View the accompanying maps here: http://povertyandinequality.acoss.org.au/maps/


Social security rate structure

This graph shows the structure of social security payments in 2017-18, the year of the income survey on which the data in this website is based. These are not current payment rates. 


Poverty in Australia 2020: Part 2, Who is affected?

Download Poverty in Australia 2020: Part 2, Who is affected? 


New report shows women with caring responsibilities at greater risk of poverty before COVID-19 and highlights risks of ‘snapback’

New analysis of poverty in Australia finds that, before COVID-19, households with children with a female main income earner were more than twice as likely to live in poverty as those in which the main income earner was male, highlighting the impact of caring roles on poverty in Australia. The report also finds that people who were unemployed were at greatest risk of poverty, with two-thirds of people in affected households living below the poverty line. The report’s findings confirm, once again, the inadequacy of pre-COVID payments for people who are unemployed. The findings lead the Poverty in Australia 2020: Part 2 – Who is affected? report, released today by the Australian Council of Social Service and UNSW Sydney. The report compares the impact of poverty on different people in the community, broken down by age, family type income source, and labour market and housing status. It includes estimates of poverty among people with disability and those from culturally and ethnically…


Profile of poverty by gender of household reference person

This graph shows the household types of people in poverty by gender of household reference person. It shows that shows that among people in poverty in older single-person households (65 years and over), women greatly outnumber men (comprising 6% of all people in poverty when the 50% of median income poverty line is used, and 8% using the 60% median income poverty line; compared with 3% who are older single men - 4% using the 60% median income poverty line). However, among people in poverty in older couple households, more are found in households with a male main earner (comprising 6% of all people in poverty according to the 50% median income poverty line and 7% according to the 60% median income poverty line, compared with 2% in older couple households with a female main earner according to both poverty lines), reflecting the predominance of couples with a male main earner in that age group.


Rate of poverty by gender of household reference person (% of all people)

This graph shows the rate of poverty according to the gender of the household reference person by household type. It shows that the rate of poverty in sole parent families where the main earner is female is 37% using the 50% median income poverty line, and 50% using the 60% median income poverty line. This is over twice that of sole parent families where the main earner is male (at 18% using the 50% median income poverty line and 21% using the 60% median income poverty line). It also shows that couple-with-children households where the main earner is female have a rate of poverty far higher than those in which the main earner is male (16% female and 10% male according to the 50% median income poverty line; and 21% female and 16% male according to the 60% median income poverty line). The graph shows that the differences in poverty rates among households with male and female main earners are not as stark for households without children as for those with children.


Finbar O'Mallon

One in eight Australians now live below the poverty line