Trends in income support payments compared with wages

This graph compares the single maximum rate of Newstart Allowance and pension payments with wages, represented by the minimum wage, average weekly full-time earnings and the median full-time wage, in 2018 dollars. It shows that the gap between the Newstart Allowance and single pension rates, as well as average and median wages, has grown over time.  


Profile of each income group by age

This graph shows the make-up of each income group by age.  2017-18: The largest age-group in every income group are 25-64 year olds, reflecting their greater share of the overall population. However, older individuals are over-represented (66%) in the lowest 40% income group, as are children aged under 15 (45%). Almost half (48%) of people of working age, 25-64 years, were in the highest 40% income group, reflecting that age group’s larger size and greater earning capacity. 2015-16: The largest age-group in every income group are 25-64 year olds. However, older individuals are over-represented (29%) in the lowest 20% income group, and children are over-represented (23%) in the second 20%. In contrast, individuals found in the highest 20% are much more likely to be aged 25-64 years (68%).


Trends in average wealth

This shows changes in the real value (after inflation) of net household wealth. The average value of household wealth (minus debts such as home mortgages) rose steadily from $644,000 in 2003-04 to $836,000 in 2009-10, when the Global Financial Crisis occurred. Average wealth then dipped slightly to $802,000 in 2011-12 before rising again to $936,000 in 2015-16.


Rate of poverty by housing tenure

This graph shows the poverty rate of people by housing tenure –whether they own the house with or without a mortgage; whether they rent either privately or publicly; or whether they have another form of occupation type.  2017-18: The graph shows that the risk of poverty is twice as great (19% using 50% median income poverty line and 28% using 60% median income poverty ine) for people in households renting privately than for home-owners (9% using 50% median income poverty line or 19% using median income poverty line) or home purchasers (9% using 50% median income poverty line or 13% using median income poverty line), reflecting the higher cost and/or lower incomes of people in private rental housing. 2015-16: The graph shows that households who rent privately have twice has much risk of poverty (at 21% using 50% median income poverty line and 31% using 60% median income poverty line) than households who own their home (8% using 50% median income poverty line or 18% using 60% median…